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1 Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Sat Sep 22, 2012 11:52 am

SSC


Admin

Obama accuses Hill lawmakers of ducking elected duties, amid criticism he's doing likewise at the UN
Published September 22, 2012
FoxNews.com

FILE: Sept. 13, 2012: President Obama speaks during a campaign event in Golden, Colo. (AP)

President Obama on Saturday accused Capitol Hill lawmakers of leaving behind both Washington and unfinished legislative business until after November because they are more concerned about their re-election campaigns, amid criticism he is side-stepping key United Nations meetings next week to hit the campaign trail.

The Senate closed the Capitol early Saturday after passing a spending bill that will make sure the government won't shut down Oct. 1, the start of the new budget year. The so-called continuing resolution passed by a 62-30 vote.

The Republican-controlled House left Friday after passing the Stop the War on Coal Act –- a bill to held the coal industry’s fight against administration energy and environmental policies and hurt Obama's political prospects in coal states such as Ohio and Virginia.

Obama accuses lawmakers of being "more worried about their jobs and their paychecks" than their constituents, in his weekend radio and Internet address.

Meanwhile the world's leaders are arriving in New York for next week's United Nations General Assembly meeting, but the president has no plans to meet privately with any of them.

However, he and first lady Michelle Obama will make an appearance on "The View," a freewheeling TV talk show more likely to reach voters than the president would with the diplomacy he is skipping at the United Nations.

Unlike presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush did during their respective 1996 and 2004 re-election seasons, Obama is skipping the face-to-face meetings with counterparts where much of the U.N. works gets done, leaving Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton to pick up more of those sessions.

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney said last week that Obama not planning to meet in with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is "confusing and troubling."

In addition, more than 40 people, including the U.S. ambassador to Libya, have been killed in violence over the past few weeks in the Middle East and North Africa.

Obama will address the entire United Nations Assembly in a speech Tuesday, and White House officials have said a meeting with Netanyahu perhaps Thursday or Friday is still possible.

Obama's itinerary on Monday and Tuesday is compressed so that he can get back to campaigning in some of the most contested states such as Ohio and Virginia.

The 112th Congress – often called the most partisan, least productive Congress in memory -- left behind unfinished legislation on the taxes, the federal budget, farm policy and to save the Postal Service from insolvency.

The Democrat-controlled Senate’ session was preceded by a scrap between Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., and Republicans over Reid's insistence on advancing legislation by Sen. Jon Tester of Montana to boost access to public lands for hunting and fishing.

Tester is perhaps the Senate's most endangered Democrat and Republicans protested that he was being given special treatment in a clearly political move to boost his re-election chances. The measure cleared a procedural hurdle by an 84-7 vote.

The votes came at midnight to give senators who had scattered from Washington time to return.

Among those out of town was incumbent Sen. Claire McCaskill was in Missouri for a debate with Republican challenger xxx. Tester and McCaskill’s races are among a handful that could decided whether Democrats maintain control of the Senate.

The only must-do item on Capitol Hill was the six-month spending measure to fulfill the bare minimum of Congress' responsibilities by keeping the government running after the current budget year ends on Sept. 30.

The spending measure permits spending on agency operating budgets at levels agreed to under last summer's hard-fought budget and debt deal between Obama and Capitol Hill Republicans. That's 0.6 percent increase from current spending rates, which represents a defeat for House Republicans, who had sought to cut about 2 percent below the budget deal and shift $8 billion from domestic programs to the Pentagon.

Reid also relented to a demand by Tea Party Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., for a vote on suspending foreign aid to the governments of Libya, Egypt and Pakistan. Paul only got 10 votes. But Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., won approval of a nonbinding resolution supporting steps to make sure Iran doesn't develop a nuclear weapon.

It's the earliest pre-election exit by Congress from Washington since 1960, though lawmakers will return after the Nov. 6 vote to deal with unfinished work.

The approval rating for the current Congress dropped to 13 percent in a Gallup poll this month. That was, the lowest ever for an election year. The GOP-controlled House and Democratic Senate managed to come together with Obama to enact just 173 new laws. More are coming after the election, but the current tally is roughly half the output of a typical Congress.

Even so, political pundits say Republicans are strong favorites to keep the House while Democratic chances of keeping the Senate are on the upswing with Obama's rise in the polls.

The exit from Washington leaves the bulk of Congress' agenda for a post-Nov. 6 session in which it's hoped lawmakers will be liberated from the election-year paralysis that has ground Capitol Hill to a near halt.

Topping the lame-duck agenda will be the George W. Bush-era tax cuts, which expire Dec. 31, and more than $100 billion in across-the-board spending cuts set to strike at the same time. The cuts are punishment for the failure of last year's deficit "supercommittee" to strike a deal.

Also left in limbo is the farm bill, stalled in the House due to opposition from conservative Republicans who think it doesn't cut farm subsidies and food stamps enough and Democrats who think its food stamp cuts are too harsh.

The current farm act expires on Sept. 30 but the lapse won't have much practical effect in the near term. Still, it's a political black eye for Republicans, especially in states such as North Dakota and Iowa.

The lack of productivity of the 112th Congress was the result of divided government and bitter partisanship.

Congress' major accomplishments tended to be legislation that mostly extended current policies, such as a highway bill, and legislation demanded by Obama to renew a 2 percentage point payroll tax cuts and extend student loan subsidies.

Even this Congress' signature accomplishment -- a budget and debt deal enacted last summer to cut $2.1 trillion from the budget over 10 years -- delayed the most difficult decisions by assigning the supercommittee the job of finding at least $1.2 trillion in deficit savings.

When that failed, House Republicans walked away from the budget deal by pressing for further cuts to domestic appropriations and reversing some on the pact's Pentagon cuts.

In the Senate, Reid worked closely with the White House to use the Senate schedule for Obama's political advantage, repeatedly forcing votes on closing tax breaks for oil companies and raising taxes on upper bracket earners.

But Reid failed to schedule debates on any of the 12 annual appropriations bills and the Democratic-led chamber, for the third year in a row, failed to pass a budget.

Republicans also point to almost 40 items of House-passed jobs-related legislation sitting stalled in the Senate.

"This isn't leadership. It is negligence," said House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio.

Senate Democrats cited their progress on bills such as a renewal of farm programs and legislation to overhaul the Postal Service and give it an infusion of cash to stave off insolvency.

"The reality is for as closely as divided as this Senate is, we passed a large number of bipartisan bills this year, very important bills, but as you all know, it takes two chambers to pass a law," said Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. "On the other side, too many of the Congress members, particularly the tea party folks, think compromise is a dirty word."



Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2012/09/22/obama-accused-hill-lawmakers-ducking-elected-duties-amid-criticism-doing/#ixzz27D5hccpF

2 Re: Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Sat Sep 22, 2012 1:01 pm

gypsy


Moderator
Congress has the lowest approval rating by We the people than any congress ever had, I agree with Chuck Schumer_____

"The reality is for as closely as divided as this Senate is, we passed a large number of bipartisan bills this year, very important bills, but as you all know, it takes two chambers to pass a law," said Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. "On the other side, too many of the Congress members, particularly the tea party folks, think compromise is a dirty word."

3 Re: Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Sat Sep 22, 2012 1:28 pm

SSC


Admin
Obama had control, what did they accompolish during that time ? Why is Reid delaying ?? Wonder if these are so sensitive they might cause election troules for the Dems ? Just a thought.

4 Re: Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Sat Sep 22, 2012 1:32 pm

gypsy


Moderator
your questions are an excuse to hate our president.we only had control for less than a year, he presented and passed many bills, I have copied and pasted many of them here, so maybe use your ummm knowledge and chack it out, now I am going to continue to ignore you, final answer.. your very tiresome.

5 Re: Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Sat Sep 22, 2012 3:44 pm

SSC


Admin
I don't need to 'chack' anything out, you have ducked answers and continue to so it is my opinion you have no answers. Thus explaining your evasiveness, and half hearted attack. No problem ignore me all you want, don't think you have it in you.
I told you I don't hate him, I am disgusted by him and his failed policy. He has hurt many people in his quest for control.

6 Re: Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Sat Sep 22, 2012 4:04 pm

gypsy


Moderator

WASHINGTON (AP) — A breeze of momentum on his side, President Barack Obama was trying to shore up support in a pivotal state Saturday while he and rival Mitt Romney argue over who can change the country's political culture and best protect the financial and health security of older Americans.
http://news.yahoo.com/obama-aims-wisconsin-romney-seeks-calif-cash-090702812--election.html
Obama was traveling to Wisconsin, which his campaign had considered safely in his column, for his first visit since February. Obama aides seem eager to fortify that hold in case Romney's running mate, Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan, can erode some of the president's support as the candidates' first debate, on Oct. 3, fast approaches.

Facing some second-guessing within his own party over his strategy, Romney planned to raise money in California in hopes of recovering his fundraising advantage. Last month, for the first time, Obama and the Democratic Party raised more than Romney and the Republican Party, $114 million to $111.6 million.

Romney has opened a new line of attack against Obama, saying the president has failed to deliver on his promise of change. Ryan, campaigning Saturday in Miami, reinforced that message by poking at Obama's recent comment that it's hard to change Washington from the inside without mobilizing public pressure on Congress from the outside.

"Why do we send presidents to the White House in the first place?" Ryan asked. "We send presidents to change and fix the mess in Washington, and if this president has admitted that he can't change Washington, then you know what, we need to change presidents."

Obama is hitting back by portraying Romney as an insider beholden to partisan and corporate interests. Vice President Joe Biden seconded his boss during a Saturday appearance before an audience of Teamsters kicking off an effort to canvass for votes in Manchester, N.H.

Biden said it was because of unions that the U.S. has a strong middle class, and he accused Romney and Ryan of having "a completely different value set, a completely different vision."

"They're doubling down on everything that caused the economic crisis in the first place," he said.

Romney on Friday tried to put an end to an old sticking point by releasing his 2011 tax returns and his past tax rates. The disclosures reinforced his status as one of the wealthiest candidates ever to seek the presidency. Obama tried to gain an edge with older voters and near-retirement baby boomers by renewing his criticism of Romney's Medicare proposals.

Obama entered the weekend with polls showing him in a near tie with Romney nationally. But the latest Wall Street Journal/NBC News/Marist Poll shows the president with leads among likely voters of 8 percentage points in Iowa and 5 points each in Colorado and Wisconsin, some of the most competitive states. Polls published earlier this week pointed to leads for Obama in closely contested Virginia and Ohio.

In a potential opening for Romney, fresh state-by-state unemployment numbers show rises in August unemployment in five critical states.

Romney, responding to Obama's comments about how hard it is to change Washington from the inside, said Friday in Las Vegas: "Over history there have been people that have changed Washington from the inside," Romney said Friday in Las Vegas. "And they've done it effectively by showing leadership from the top."

Obama countered with a new line of his own: "What kind of inside job is he talking about?" He suggested that Romney would rubber-stamp the agenda of congressional Republicans or let oil companies run the country's energy policy.

"We don't want an inside job in Washington," Obama said. "We want change in Washington."

As some Republicans urged Romney to re-energize his campaign, the candidate headed to San Diego and Los Angeles to raise money Saturday. His schedule for Sunday put him in Colorado, a state where polls show Obama with a narrow lead. Starting Monday, Romney and Ryan will spend three days altogether in Ohio.

In Wisconsin, public polls still show Obama with a lead, and his campaign recently began airing ads. Vice President Joe Biden has visited the state twice this month. Ryan has held events back home three times, once with Romney along.

Obama won Wisconsin easily in 2008 but Ryan is popular. Some Republican pollsters detected a bump for Romney in the state shortly after Ryan was named his running mate. Wisconsin's 7.5 percent unemployment rate is below the national average, but the state's manufacturing industry has been hit hard in recent years.

Obama's campaign is focused on running up big margins in Milwaukee and Madison, both Democratic strongholds. Obama and Romney will be closely watching the Green Bay region, a swing area that could tip the balance in a close contest.

On Friday, Wisconsin's Republican governor, Scott Walker, said that immediately after Romney chose Ryan, the campaign displayed a new sense of enthusiasm, excitement and adrenalin.

"I haven't seen that as much lately," he said, "and I think they need to get back to that if they're going to win this election."

___

Associated Press writers Jennifer Kay in Miami, Julie Pace in Washington, Steve Peoples in Las Vegas and Holly Ramer in Manchester, N.H., contributed to this report.

7 Re: Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Wed Sep 26, 2012 10:33 pm

SSC


Admin
Eye Candy as he refered to himself on the View when the rest of the world leaders were at the UN meeting....Great leader LMAO

8 Re: Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Wed Sep 26, 2012 10:50 pm

almajean


Member
What in the world are you talking about? Was I dreaming that I saw him on the View and speaking at the UN meeting? He was even wearing the same tie!
http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/transcript-president-obama-delivers-remarks-united-nations-invokes/story?id=17319652#.UGOuaLIib-l

9 Re: Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Wed Sep 26, 2012 10:59 pm

SSC


Admin
Nope not a dream, he skipped some meetings to do the taping of the View spoke at the UN but not directly with country leaders, who had requested meetings...Pretty sad

10 Re: Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Wed Sep 26, 2012 11:07 pm

almajean


Member
Oh now I understand what you are thinking but I think this comment explains it very well.
"Another State Department official said Obama’s not meeting with any global leaders in New York was a “fine” decision, adding that because Clinton already has a relationship with many of the leaders in question, her meeting with them at the UNGA is simply a natural continuation of existing U.S. foreign policy.
“These are also relationships that she has helped him to maintain all the way through,” the official said."

11 Re: Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Wed Sep 26, 2012 11:13 pm

SSC


Admin
Oh of course I see where you are going with this, sorry don't agree I expect a president to do his job first. Not try to win over voters when our people are being murdered in other countries. Oh but he was great meeting with the Muslim Brotherhood, just not people who run countries..

12 Re: Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Wed Sep 26, 2012 11:21 pm

gypsy


Moderator
President Barack Obama addresses the 67th session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, Sept. 25, 2012. (Mary Altaffer/AP

September 25, 2012

As Prepared for Delivery –

Mr. President, Mr. Secretary-General, fellow delegates, ladies and gentleman: I would like to begin today by telling you about an American named Chris Stevens.

Chris was born in a town called Grass Valley, California, the son of a lawyer and a musician. As a young man, Chris joined the Peace Corps, and taught English in Morocco. He came to love and respect the people of North Africa and the Middle East, and he would carry that commitment throughout his life. As a diplomat, he worked from Egypt to Syria; from Saudi Arabia to Libya. He was known for walking the streets of the cities where he worked – tasting the local food, meeting as many people as he could, speaking Arabic and listening with a broad smile.

Chris went to Benghazi in the early days of the Libyan revolution, arriving on a cargo ship. As America's representative, he helped the Libyan people as they coped with violent conflict, cared for the wounded, and crafted a vision for a future in which the rights of all Libyans would be respected. After the revolution, he supported the birth of a new democracy, as Libyans held elections, built new institutions, and began to move forward after decades of dictatorship.

Chris Stevens loved his work. He took pride in the country he served, and saw dignity in the people he met. Two weeks ago, he travelled to Benghazi to review plans to establish a new cultural center and modernize a hospital. That's when America's compound came under attack. Along with three of his colleagues, Chris was killed in the city he helped to save. He was 52 years old.

I tell you this story because Chris Stevens embodied the best of America. Like his fellow Foreign Service officers, he built bridges across oceans and cultures, and was deeply invested in the international cooperation that the United Nations represents. He acted with humility, but stood up for a set of principles – a belief that individuals should be free to determine their own destiny, and live with liberty, dignity, justice, and opportunity.

The attacks on our civilians in Benghazi were attacks on America. We are grateful for the assistance we received from the Libyan government and the Libyan people. And there should be no doubt that we will be relentless in tracking down the killers and bringing them to justice. I also appreciate that in recent days, the leaders of other countries in the region – including Egypt, Tunisia, and Yemen – have taken steps to secure our diplomatic facilities, and called for calm. So have religious authorities around the globe.

But the attacks of the last two weeks are not simply an assault on America. They are also an assault on the very ideals upon which the United Nations was founded – the notion that people can resolve their differences peacefully; that diplomacy can take the place of war; and that in an interdependent world, all of us have a stake in working towards greater opportunity and security for our citizens.

If we are serious about upholding these ideals, it will not be enough to put more guards in front of an Embassy; or to put out statements of regret, and wait for the outrage to pass. If we are serious about those ideals, we must speak honestly about the deeper causes of this crisis. Because we face a choice between the forces that would drive us apart, and the hopes we hold in common.

13 Re: Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Wed Sep 26, 2012 11:26 pm

gypsy


Moderator
almajean wrote:What in the world are you talking about? Was I dreaming that I saw him on the View and speaking at the UN meeting? He was even wearing the same tie!
http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/transcript-president-obama-delivers-remarks-united-nations-invokes/story?id=17319652#.UGOuaLIib-l
thank you Alma

14 Re: Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Wed Sep 26, 2012 11:29 pm

almajean


Member
He was doing his job and please remember that to continue to do it he needs to stay in office. Being on the talk shows is a very good way to campaign. He doesn't have the financial resources of his rich boy opponent. Money has bought more than one election. And please knock off the stupid muslin brotherhood remarks.

15 Re: Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Wed Sep 26, 2012 11:37 pm

gypsy


Moderator
almajean wrote:He was doing his job and please remember that to continue to do it he needs to stay in office. Being on the talk shows is a very good way to campaign. He doesn't have the financial resources of his rich boy opponent. Money has bought more than one election
I do agree..we must stand together,,for the people

16 Re: Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Wed Sep 26, 2012 11:59 pm

almajean


Member
That is not exactly what I said. Close but no cigar. If anyone is going to "quote" me please get it correct. Rolling Eyes

17 Re: Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Thu Sep 27, 2012 12:48 am

gypsy


Moderator
lol I copied your post~

18 Re: Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Thu Sep 27, 2012 6:33 am

runawayhorses


Owner
She was referring to this:
gypsy wrote: I do agree..we must stand together,,for the people
She meant she didn't say "we must stand together for the people". You were putting words in her mouth.

On another note, I corrected your mess ups with the quote code. You have to write your message 'After' the quote codes and not erase any of the code or it doesn't work. Please preview your post to see if its correct before sending it, if its not correct and you don't know how to fix it abort the message by clicking the back key on your browser, or click the "Home" button in the navigation menu. The forum program doesn't care how you abort sending the message, just don't send it if its not correct. Then go back and try again if you want.

19 Re: Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Thu Sep 27, 2012 8:53 am

SSC


Admin
Alma not my fault he met with the Muslim Brotherhood, that was his choice and obviously more important than meeting with the Israeli leaders or others. He is showing no leadership at a crucial time with so much world unrest,but you obviously are a staunch Dem.so you will see only the good in Obama. Not once in his UN speech did he refer to the murders as an act of terror, but a bump in the road. I just think the lost lives were a little more important than The View.

20 Re: Why isn't a UN meeting top priority ?? on Thu Sep 27, 2012 11:21 am

gypsy


Moderator
almajean wrote:That is not exactly what I said. Close but no cigar. If anyone is going to "quote" me please get it correct. Rolling Eyes
sorry Alma I put my thoughts in with your quote,,should have separated them.. I saw him speak at the UN Meeting also..

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