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1 Healthcare reform draws nearer on Sun Dec 13, 2009 12:33 am

rosco 357


Veteran
MY WORDS:well who knows, if this will stick, i have said all along Rahm Emanuel would put the liberals inline if it came to that, and it might, but we shall see, things still change daily,, the public option has been out every since Lieberman said he would filibuster it, im surprised the buy into medicare for 55 to 64 year olds might be in there in place of he public option, still lots up in the air,like the CBO report, i think, thats why i stoped posting because things changed so much, but this is starting to take shape now,,but its what the CBO says now. if someone has posted this sorry i have not read the boards,



Healthcare reform draws nearer

By Edward Luce in Washington

Published: December 10 2009 23:26 | Last updated: December 10 2009 23:26

Barack Obama’s healthcare reform, the signature policy of his presidency, looks likely to clear its most formidable obstacle by Christmas.

Within the next few days, the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office will give its fiscal “scoring” of the compromise reached on Tuesday between five moderate and five liberal Democratic senators.

If the CBO were to pronounce the package at least deficit-neutral – a big if, given the body’s ­Jesuitical approach to bud­get accounting – the way would probably be cleared for a rapid vote in the Senate. Since the House of Representatives has already passed its own 1,990-page bill, only a seismic intervention could stop it from reaching Mr Obama’s desk within the ensuing weeks.

On Thursday, aides to Harry Reid, the Senate majority leader, said they believed the latest formulation would attract the 60 votes needed to prevent Republicans from being able to block it.

In addition, the fact Mr Reid is engaging the interest of two Republicans, Olympia Snowe and Susan Collins, both senators for Maine, has provided added confidence that they may be able to afford to lose one Democratic vote in the upper chamber.

“We put together a bill that we believe has the best chance to overcome a Republican filibuster,” said Jim Manley, an aide to the Senate majority leader.

But he added: “Mary Landrieu and Blan­che Lincoln [centrist Democratic senators from Louisiana and Arkansas] are saying they’re not going to agree to anything until we hear back from the CBO.”

The smart money in Washington is now betting that the arduous and often unseemly legislative process is within spitting distance of a ­conclusion.

Len Nichols, a fellow at the centrist New America Foundation and probably one of the most experienced analysts of the Byzantine process, said: “In my judgment, the co-operation of the moderate and liberal Democrats and the fact that Snowe and Collins are in the conversation signals a real likelihood this will get through the Senate by Christmas and be on the president’s desk before his State of the Union address [in late January].”

Should the bill get the go-ahead from the CBO, Mr Reid is likely to push for a Senate vote as rapidly as possible, assuming he has garnered the 60 votes by then. After that, the bill would either have to be merged with the House version or else could even bypass the bicameral reconciliation process and go for a direct vote in the lower chamber – an unusual route but one that could circumvent the process.

Nancy Pelosi, the House speaker, who has insisted on a public insurance option, the measure that has attracted the most argument, on Thursday played down the differences between the two bills.

“We are waiting on the actions of the US Senate and hopefully we will be able to send it very, very soon to the president’s desk,” she said on Thursday.

The latest Senate compromise formed a new “Medicare buy-in” to allow people aged 55-64 to buy the healthcare coverage currently available only to senior citizens. It came at the expense of the public option.

Some liberals would fight to the finish to retain the public option, a watered-down version of which was passed in the House bill. But most Democrats are falling in line with the thinking of Rahm Emanuel, Mr Obama’s pugilistic chief-of-staff, who said: “The only non-negotiable principle here is success.”

Washington insiders bel­ieve a historic healthcare act would give Mr Obama and the Democratic party a boost ahead of next year’s mid-term elections. But polls, which show mixed support for healthcare reform, suggest the reality may not be so simple.

“All the revenue-raising measures – the taxes and fees – come up-front, while the benefits don’t kick in until 2013 and 2014,” says Robert Blendon, the leading healthcare pollster. “There would be an initial surge in support for this historic achievement, followed by quite a big backlash as the costs seep through.”

2 Re: Healthcare reform draws nearer on Sun Dec 13, 2009 1:47 am

gypsy


Moderator
I think it will all work out/I firmly believe we will recover/with Obamas protocol/plan
if Obama doesn't win the next election/the proposals will steer the way,then someone else will take the torch~!if not Obama>>

reckon who it will be
any suggestions?

3 Re: Healthcare reform draws nearer on Sun Dec 13, 2009 5:33 pm

rosco 357


Veteran
gypsy wrote:I think it will all work out/I firmly believe we will recover/with Obamas protocol/plan
if Obama doesn't win the next election/the proposals will steer the way,then someone else will take the torch~!if not Obama>>

reckon who it will be
any suggestions?

obama got 3 years left, its way to early to speculate the presidential election, things change so fast,

4 Re: Healthcare reform draws nearer on Sun Dec 13, 2009 5:49 pm

gypsy


Moderator
very true Rosco

5 Re: Healthcare reform draws nearer on Sun Dec 13, 2009 6:19 pm

SSC


Admin
Abortion funding and massive added pork spending, the cold numbers of those already covered by medicare and the very real possibility their form of treatment will never be the same are some very stark realities. Can the Medicare system take on millions more to be covered and not lose the quality of care or have it eliminated totally. This is going beyond party lines this is common sense.With the cuts in treatment, the availability of medical devices, the denial of advanced care, no crossing state lines in search of treatment...and now the certainty of a huge shortage in Doctors..This is dooming the aged and ill..
My neighbor just had her hip replaced to the tune of $500.000.00, she now needs the other one done, Medicare sent a letter of denial emphasizing the excessive cost. She now is considering going to Japan where the procedure is much cheaper. Examples of Medicare denial are very common and even the new plan will cut these procedures even more.
The bottom line is don't get sick...

6 Re: Healthcare reform draws nearer on Sun Dec 13, 2009 6:38 pm

rosco 357


Veteran
just a thought or me wondering, if we are the only industrialized country in the world not to have universal health care, why is it cheeper in Japan,maybe we should check out japans plan. this is what confuses me, they listed a while back the 2 countrys in the world with the best health care, the united states was not one of them, there were 2 pole, i forget, one had Sweden or Switzerland , one had Germany and one had Australia, and i forget the other,it could have been japan i think,,, but both places had differing opinions as each had 2 different countries, that had the worlds best healthcare. i imagine one big factor is total population coverage. anyway we will see how it goes, im just curious, is all, take care

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