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rosco 357


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wow marc , she is good, i dont think i ever could learn that, i dont know if certain ppl voice can do it and some not, but i dont think my voice could do it, thanks for that,

runawayhorses


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Frankly, I don't know that I would ever want my voice to do that, let alone learn it, whats that called Yodeling? lmao

Anyway, it was cute but not my style of music.

rosco 357


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tyler i use to hear ppl yoldel alot on tv and place, but not in a while, but i always enjoyed it, i mean i would not buy a yoldeling greatest hits or anything lol, but still like to here it, from time to time. i have not reserched it but it seems it was in the mountains of switzerland or sweden, ppl yoldeded, alot, but not sure,

rosco 357


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Yodeling (or yodelling, jodeling) is a form of singing that involves singing an extended note which rapidly and repeatedly changes in pitch from the vocal or chest register (or "chest voice") to the falsetto voice, making a high-low-high-low sound. This vocal technique is used in many cultures throughout the world.


History
In Alpine folk music, it was probably developed in the Swiss Alps as a method of communication between mountain peaks, later becoming part of the region's traditional music. In Persian and Azeri classical music, singers frequently use tahrir, a yodeling technique that oscillates on neighbor tones. In Georgian traditional music, yodelling takes the form of krimanchuli technique, and is used as a top part in three/four part polyphony. In Central Africa, Pygmy singers use yodels within their elaborate polyphonic singing. Yodeling is often used in American bluegrass and country music. According to the Oxford English Dictionary the word yodel is derived from a German word jodeln (originally Bavarian) meaning "to utter the syllable jo."


Technique
All human voices are considered to have at least two distinct vocal registers, called the "head" and "chest" voices, which result from different ways that the tone is produced[1]. Most people can sing tones within a certain range of relatively lower pitch in their chest voices, and then a certain range of relatively higher pitch in their head voices. There is often a gap between these ranges[citation needed], especially in inexperienced or untrained singers. Experienced singers, who can control their voices to the point where these ranges overlap, can easily switch between them to produce high-quality tones in either. Yodeling is a particular application of this technique, wherein a singer might switch between these registers several times in but a few seconds, at a high volume. Going back and forth over this "voice break" repeatedly produces a very distinctive type of sound.

For example, in the famous example syllable "Yudl - Ay - EEE - Ooooo", the "EEE" is sung in the head voice,[citation needed] while all other syllables are in the chest voice.

The best places for Alpine-style yodeling are those with an echo. They include lakes, rocky gorges, anywhere with a distant rock face, the outdoor areas between office buildings, in a canoe next to a rocky shoreline, or down a long hallway, and best of all, a mountain range.

runawayhorses


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I think a form of yodeling is used by some artist in today's music, a 'calmed down version' if you will, you can hear it in some modern music sometimes, but the full blown version is often times heard in bluegrass music or really old country songs, but its cool it just takes some getting used to when done like that.

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runawayhorses wrote:Frankly, I don't know that I would ever want my voice to do that, let alone learn it, whats that called Yodeling? lmao

Anyway, it was cute but not my style of music.
I'm absolutely floored that you didn't know what yodeling is. Frankly, I always found extended yodeling sessions as boring and as tiresome as extended drum solos. Anyway, my boundless enthusiasm for this young lady's performance is based on her age and her delivery. Like Roscoe's opera singer, this girl's very matured singing voice shocked me as much as it did the AGT judges. And like the 6 year old (not a single singing lesson!) Connie, all 3 seem to have perfect pitch. Very few people have that inate ability and few of those can sing. These girls,in my opinion,show a rare,if not unique,talent.

runawayhorses


Owner
Well, I actually knew what Yodeling was, I was just pretending like I had never heard it before trying to be sarcastic and funny, but I did know it was Yodeling.

I agree on the vocal talent of those girls they obviously have plenty. I applaud all 3 girls we've seen so far.

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