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1 Traditional Southern New Year's Day Menu on Wed Dec 31, 2014 6:29 pm

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Traditional Southern New Yearís Day Menu

by Jackie Garvin
Traditional Southern New Year's Day Menu. Steeped in tradition, each component of a traditional Southern New Year's Day menu is symbolic.

Of all the events we celebrate in the South, the menu for a traditional Southern New Yearís Day probably carries the most tradition. Each component has a special meaning. We wouldnít think of letting New Yearís Day get passed us without enjoying this traditional meal. The foods represent progress, luck, money and gold. Why take a chance? Below the link to the recipe, Iíve included an explanation of the significance of the dish as part of the Southern traditional New Yearís Day menu.



Oven Roasted Pork Chops

A pig roots forward. A chicken scratches backwards. A cow stands still. Pork symbolizes forward progress. If Iím feeding lots of folks, Iíll cook a Rosemary Garlic Pork Loin Roast. Since we only had three today, I opted for pork chops. Just to make sure Iíve covered the bases, I always use pork seasoning, either ham hocks or ham, in the collards and blackeye peas. You just canít be too careful.



Collard Greens and Ham Hocks

Greens symbolize money. You can use any kind of greens, it doesnít have to be collards. Even cabbage is acceptable. At least thatís what I think. If Iíve been wrong all this time, I donít even want to know. Collards can either be the best thing youíve ever put in your mouth or the worst. You have to pay attention to the seasoning in collards to make them good. Making a good stock from ham hocks or ham is something I highly recommend. Add salt as needed and either sugar or honey to balance the bitterness. Also, strip them off the big vein in the center of the leaf. That thing is no good. Itís tough and bitter.

Blackeye Peas

Eat blackeye peas for luck. Some believe that you need to eat 365 peas to solidify your luck. I donít count my peas. I just make sure to eat plenty. We like our peas served over Basmati rice which isnít part of the tradition. We simply like the way it tastes.

Lacey Cornbread

Cornbread cooked in little medallion shaped pieces represent gold. As high as gold is, I think Iíll cook lacey cornbread for the next 364 days.

Traditional Southern New Year's Day Menu. Steeped in tradition, each component of a traditional Southern New Year's Day menu is symbolic.

From our Southern home to yours, Happy New Years, yíall! We wish you good luck, prosperity, progress and lots of good tomatoes in 2015

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